WELCOME! Spacerox offers the finest quality meteorites from the Moon and Mars for sale. Spacerox is operated by Mickey Law, a biologist with a passion for meteorites who has been studying space rocks since 1982. He has been a member of the Meteoritical Society since 1998 and is IMCA member #2164. PLEASE NOTE: You can click on the Moon or Mars images above for some historical background on these amazing planetary meteorites.
 


LUNAR  METEORITES


 
 

1cm scale cube
 
 

 

 
 
NORTHWEST AFRICA (NWA) 2995:  LUNAR FELDSPATHIC BRECCIA
Found 2005 Algeria; Approved 2006 as Official Meteorite in Meteoritical Bulletin 90
 
NWA 2995 is a jaw-dropping spectacular meteorite! It displays dozens of 1-6mm anorthosite and basalt clasts easily seen with the naked eye, and hundreds of 0.5-1mm clasts easily seen with a simple magnifying glass. These clasts are of various anorthosites, basalts, plus many examples of clasts within a clast. Lunar orbital data indicates the very deep and thin crusted South Pole-Aitken Impact Basin is the most likely place of origin for this meteorite. This would explain some black pyroxene material not being extrusive mare basalt, but instead being intrusive mantle basalt from a fissure in the thin anorthosite crust. NWA 2995 would definitely be the showpiece in any meteorite collection! Click photo to enlarge.
 
Catalog #SR0204:  0.85g partial slice; 18mm x 26mm x 1mm; SOLD
Catalog #SR0219:  1.50g partial slice; 24mm x 40mm x 1mm; $2,780
 
 

 

1cm scale cube
 
 

 

 
NORTHWEST AFRICA (NWA) 8277:  LUNAR MINGLED BRECCIA
Found 2013 Northwest Africa; Approved 2014 as Official Meteorite in Meteoritical Bulletin 103
 
NWA 8277 is a fantastic naked eye example of both a mingled breccia and a regolith breccia. Both of these breccia types are formed near the lunar regolith surface; and their main characteristic is multiple breccias contained within another breccia. The large 5mm clast seen near the center shows two white plagioclase clasts and many greenish brown olivine clasts contained within a grayish brown pyroxene clast. To the left is a 4mm plagioclase clast with olivine clasts within it. To the right are two 1.5mm anorthosite clasts with pyroxene clasts within them. This is the perfect meteorite to illustrate "breccias within a breccia" without the need of a microscope. Click photo to enlarge.
 
Catalog #SR0207:  2.13g partial slice; 23mm x 24mm x 2mm; SOLD
 
 

 

1cm scale cube
 
 

 

 
NORTHWEST AFRICA (NWA) 482:  LUNAR IMPACT MELT
Found 2000 Algeria; Approved 2001 as Official Meteorite in Meteoritical Bulletin 85
 
NWA 482 is an extremely rare lunar meteorite that contains only original highland anorthosite crust minerals! It contains absolutely no detectable basalt minerals. The darker areas are impact melted plagioclase. This suggests the meteorite's origin is from deep in the original lunar crust on the Moon’s far side where impacts continually melted and re-melted it for billions of years. The far side anorthosite crust is much thicker than the near side and has considerably less basalt contamination from near side impact ejecta. NWA 482 is completely unique among all the known lunar meteorites by containing only original lunar crust materials. Fusion crust is visible on the angled edge. Click photo to enlarge.
 
Catalog #SR0208:  0.38g partial slice; 9mm x 14mm x 1.5mm; $1,675
 
 

 

1cm scale cube
 
 

 

 
NORTHWEST AFRICA (NWA) 8609:  LUNAR FELDSPATHIC BRECCIA
Found 2014 Northwest Africa; Approved 2014 as Official Meteorite in Meteoritical Bulletin 103
 
NWA 8609 is a terrific lunar highland meteorite to examine with only the naked eye. It shows more than a dozen 2-5mm anorthosite clasts and countless smaller clasts. There are also a few 3mm size pyroxene clasts and some melt glass to see. Many of the larger clasts are themselves breccias containing olivine clasts within them. The huge clasts plus very little melt glass indicate this meteorite is from deeper in the regolith and was not part of the top surface regolith. This is the ideal lunar meteorite to enjoy with just the naked eye, but you can use a magnifying glass to view this meteorite again and again; and each time you will see clasts and crystals you never noticed before! Click photo to enlarge.
 
Catalog #SR0211:  2.04g partial slice; 17mm x 37mm x 2mm; $965
 
 

 

1cm scale cube
 
 
 

 
 

 
NORTHWEST AFRICA (NWA) 8682:  LUNAR FELDSPATHIC BRECCIA
Found 2014 Northwest Africa; Approved 2014 as Official Meteorite in Meteoritical Bulletin 103
 
NWA 8682 is an absolute joy to examine with a simple magnifying glass! It is officially a feldspathic breccia, but it could be classified as a regolith breccia because almost all the clasts it contains are themselves breccias. The obvious 4mm white anorthosite clast contains gray olivine and black pyroxene clasts within it. Several smaller anorthosite clasts with olivine and pyroxene clasts within them are very easy to see with a magnifying glass. A magnifying glass also reveals at least a dozen 0.5-1mm olivine clasts containing pyroxene clasts within them. A large number of clasts that are actually breccias within a breccia definitely indicates an origin very near the surface of the Moon. Click photo to enlarge.
 
Catalog #SR0214:  0.42g partial slice; 10mm x 15mm x 1.5mm; $725
 
 

 

1cm scale cube
 
 
 

 
 

 
NORTHWEST AFRICA (NWA) 10822:  LUNAR FELDSPATHIC BRECCIA
Found 2016 Northwest Africa; Approved 2016 as Official Meteorite in Meteoritical Bulletin 105
 
NWA 10822 is truly a gorgeous example of what the surface of the Moon actually looks like! Many dozens of 1-6mm white plagioclase clasts, and at least a dozen 1-2mm orange brown pyroxene clasts are easily visible to the naked eye. In many cases, bright shock melt plagioclase glass seems to outline the large clasts in black for accent. One side is polished to a very high gloss, while the other side remains completely natural. Only a few small nicks prevent this from being a complete slice, and 90% or more of the fusion crust remains. If you were walking on the surface of the Moon and looked down, this is exactly what you would expect to see beneath your feet! Click photo to enlarge.
 
Catalog #SR0215:  5.57g partial slice; 38mm x 43mm x 1.5mm; SOLD
 
 

 

1cm scale cube
 
 
 

 
 

 
NORTHWEST AFRICA (NWA) 11474:  LUNAR FELDSPATHIC BRECCIA
Found 2017 Northwest Africa; Approved 2017 as Official Meteorite in Meteoritical Bulletin 106
 
NWA 11474 broke into many small fragments without fusion crust as it entered Earth's atmosphere. This is one of those fragments that has not been wire brushed, polished, or cut. It has been left just as it appeared when it fell to Earth. At least two dozen 1-3mm anorthosite clasts are easily visible with the naked eye, and shock melt glass surrounds many of these clasts. This fragment was still quite hot when it landed in the Sahara Desert sand, and some of the brown or tan desert sand melted and fused onto the meteorite's surface. If you came upon this meteorite in the desert, picked it up, and wiped it clean; this is exactly what you would be holding in your hand. Click photo to enlarge.
 
Catalog #SR0216:  1.57g individual; 12mm x 15mm x 7mm; $540
 
 

 

1cm scale cube
 
 
 

 
 

 
NORTHWEST AFRICA (NWA) 11474:  LUNAR FELDSPATHIC BRECCIA
Found 2017 Northwest Africa; Approved 2017 as Official Meteorite in Meteoritical Bulletin 106
 
NWA 11474 broke into many small fragments without fusion crust as it entered Earth's atmosphere. This is one of the larger fragments that has been sliced in half to expose its interior. These fragments were still hot when they landed in the Sahara Desert, and some of the brown or tan desert sand melted and fused onto the meteorite's surface which can be seen on the back of this specimen. On the polished interior face, more than a dozen 1mm or larger anorthosite clasts are visible with the naked eye; and shock melt glass plus dozens more anorthosite clasts are revealed with just a simple magnifying glass. This is a great example of a typical lunar highland breccia. Click photo to enlarge.
 
Catalog #SR0217:  1.69g end piece; 11mm x 17mm x 5mm; $625
 
 

 

1cm scale cube
 
 
 

 
 

 
NORTHWEST AFRICA (NWA) 13974:  LUNAR IMPACT MELT BRECCIA
Found 2021 Northwest Africa; Approved 2021 as Official Meteorite in Meteoritical Bulletin 110
 
NWA 13974 is a typical example of what one should expect to find while exploring on the near-side lunar surface in the vicinity of any large mare region. This Moon rock shows the result of thousands of close by impact events which pulverized the regolith, and in many cases melted some of the small pieces together with the tremendous heat generated by those impacts. This area would have been constantly impacted, pulverized, and re-melted again and again. With a small hand lens, one can easily see a dozen or more greenish olivine clasts plus more than a half dozen white anorthosite clasts that are remarkably still visible within a mostly melted dark basalt matrix. Click photo to enlarge.
 
Catalog #SR0225:  1.51g complete slice; 16mm x 22mm x 2mm; $370
 
 


MARTIAN  METEORITES


 
 

1cm scale cube
 
 

 
 

 
 
NORTHWEST AFRICA (NWA) 998:  MARTIAN NAKHLITE
Found 2001 Northwest Africa; Approved 2003 as Official Meteorite in Meteoritical Bulletin 87
 
NWA 998 is an extremely rare example of a Nakhlite and one of the very few available to collectors. Its dark olive or black pyroxene crystals and light olive or tan olivine crystals are easily seen without magnification. The serpentine surfaces of the olivine crystals definitely indicates this molten rock interacted with water; and the large crystal size indicates an extended cooling period in a thick lava flow. These very obvious features strongly suggest this liquid magma interacted with steam in a volcanic eruption and then slowly cooled in a thick lava flow near a shield volcano on Mars. As is typical of Nakhlites, this sample is friable and not suitable for group viewing or rough handling. Click photo to enlarge.
 
Catalog #SR0202:  0.25g fragment; 5mm x 11mm x 3mm; $980
 
 

 

1cm scale cube
 
 

 

 
NORTHWEST AFRICA (NWA) 6963:  MARTIAN SHERGOTTITE
Found 2011 Morocco; Approved 2011 as Official Meteorite in Meteoritical Bulletin 100
 
NWA 6963 contains gigantic pyroxene crystals that are actually eight times the size by volume of typical Shergottite crystals! It also shows many large transparent silica crystals. A typical Shergottite is thought to result from magma that erupted from a fissure in the Martian crust and then flowed onto the surface where it quickly cooled. But the huge crystals in this Shergottite suggests it remained within the fissure where it cooled more slowly and did not erupt onto the surface. The large shock melt glass bubble in this specimen would have preserved a sample of Mars atmosphere and then released that Martian atmosphere into the room when the saw blade cut this slice! Click photo to enlarge.
 
Catalog #SR0205:  4.03g partial slice; 25mm x 24mm x 3mm; SOLD
 
 

 

1cm scale cube
 
 

 

 
ZAGAMI:  MARTIAN SHERGOTTITE
Fell 1962 Nigeria; Approved 2000 as Official Meteorite in NHM Catalogue of Meteorites
 
Zagami is considered to be the archetypical Shergottite; and it was the first Martian meteorite available to collectors. Shergottites are thought to result from magma erupting from a fissure in the Martian crust and then moving in a shallow flow across the surface where it quickly cools. This typical slice shows how solidified pyroxene crystals are oriented in the somewhat general direction of their flow. Tiny cracks are visible as plagioclase shock melt glass veins as seen on the right side of this slice. Any cracks that were open to the Martian atmosphere when the ejection impact occurred will have a sample of Mars atmosphere preserved within a shock melt glass vein bubble! Click photo to enlarge.
 
Catalog #SR0206:  1.07g partial slice; 11mm x 23mm x 1.5mm; $2,170
 
 

 

1cm scale cube
 
 

 

 
TISSINT:  MARTIAN SHERGOTTITE
Fell 2011 Morocco; Approved 2012 as Official Meteorite in Meteoritical Bulletin 100
 
Tissint is identical to the Shergottite EETA 79001, which is the meteorite containing Martian atmosphere in impact melt glass bubbles that proved all SNC meteorites are from Mars! Both of these Shergottites are also unusual in containing olivine in the form of giant megacryst clasts. Two of these 1.5mm broken olivine megacrysts are exposed on the top left of this specimen; and the typical Shergottite pattern of pyroxene crystals is seen over the entire surface. All of the visible plagioclase impact melt glass bubbles were broken open when this sample fragmented, but it is certainly possible there are intact melt glass bubbles in the interior that still preserve Mars atmosphere! Click photo to enlarge.
 
Catalog #SR0209:  1.71g fragment; 10mm x 16mm x 10mm; SOLD
 
 

 

1cm scale cube
 
 

 

 
NORTHWEST AFRICA (NWA) 2975:  MARTIAN SHERGOTTITE
Found 2005 Algeria; Approved 2006 as Official Meteorite in Meteoritical Bulletin 90
 
NWA 2975 is truly a delightful Mars rock to examine, and dozens of large olivine and pyroxene crystal shapes are easily visible beneath its melted surface crust. Shergottites are from near the surface of Mars and contain many tiny cracks from countless nearby impacts. An impact that ejects a Shergottite from Mars would create a shock wave that passes through these cracks creating a black melt glass. Any cracks open to the surface would contain Mars atmosphere, and the shock wave would trap and preserve that Martian atmosphere inside a melt glass bubble. There is no way to know if this particular Mars sample contains preserved Martian atmosphere, but it most certainly could. Click photo to enlarge.
 
Catalog #SR0213:  1.66g partial slice; 22mm x 28mm x 1mm; SOLD
Catalog #SR0220:  2.93g individual; 11mm x 17mm x 12mm; $2,580
 
 

 

1cm scale cube
 
 

 

 
NORTHWEST AFRICA (NWA) 12269:  MARTIAN SHERGOTTITE
Found 2018 Northwest Africa; Approved 2018 as Official Meteorite in Meteoritical Bulletin 107
 
NWA 12269 is a rare and most unusual Mars rock. It is very fine grained and displays the expected low-calcium pyroxene, clear silica, plus black impact melt glass. However, it contains none of the olivine normally found in Shergottites! That makes this particular meteorite extremely important because it demonstrates the accretion of Mars did not produce a homogenous liquid mantle like occurred with the accretion of Earth. Instead, it is evidence the accretion of Mars produced a heterogeneous semi-liquid mantle with zones containing different mineral mixtures. The mineralogy of NWA 12269 also indicates it was ejected from a different location on Mars than other Shergottites. Click photo to enlarge.
 
Catalog #SR0221:  1.15g end piece; 8mm x 21mm x 4mm; $690
Catalog #SR0222:  1.17g partial slice; 14mm x 19mm x 2mm; $700
Catalog #SR0223:  2.15g individual; 12mm x 14mm x 9mm; $1,290
 
 

 

1cm scale cube
 
 

 

 
NW AFRICA (NWA) 13366:  MARTIAN PERIDOTITIC SHERGOTTITE
Found 2019 Algeria; Approved 2020 as Official Meteorite in Meteoritical Bulletin 109
 
NWA 13366 is an incredibly rare Martian meteorite. Only four Peridotitic Shergottites are recognized, and NWA 13366 is one of them! Shergottites contain 0-15% olivine, but the Peridotitic Shergottites contain 50-60% olivine. NWA 13366 contains 60% olivine! Besides being extremely rare, Peridotitic Shergottites are important because they present additional evidence that the accretion of Mars did not produce a homogenous liquid mantle as occurred with the accretion of Earth. Instead, the Peridotitic Shergottites provide more evidence that the accretion of Mars produced a heterogeneous semi-liquid mantle with many zones of different mineral mixtures. Click photo to enlarge.
 
Catalog #SR0226:  3.15g partial slice; 33mm x 27mm x 1.5mm; $2,475
 
 


HOW  TO  ORDER  SPACE  ROCKS


 
Purchasing a meteorite from Spacerox is simple and secure because all transactions are made using PayPal. Be assured that Spacerox will never give or sell your address to anyone. You have our word on that. Please use the following email address for all correspondence:

 

 

TO ORDER: Send us an email with the catalog number, meteorite name, and your mailing address. We will reply with confirmation that the meteorite is still available and you will receive an email Invoice from PayPal requesting payment. Once payment has been verified by PayPal, your space rock will be on its way to you.

The prices shown in our catalog are in US Dollars and include free Priority Mail shipping to your mailing address within the United States. Please note that Spacerox can only accept orders with a delivery address within the United States. Full payment in US Dollars must be verified by PayPal before any order is shipped. All delivery liability for Spacerox ends when the delivery is verified at the buyer's mailing address by the US Postal Service.

Please understand that all sales are final. Spacerox does not sell meteorites on approval. It is your responsibility to be certain the meteorite you purchase is the meteorite you want. Spacerox guarantees the meteorite you receive will be exactly the meteorite shown and described in the above catalog. You are welcome to request additional photos or descriptive information before making a purchase, but Spacerox does not accept returns.